Eve Bratman

Lead Faculty
International Development

Politics of Global Development


Degrees

Ph.D., American University
BA with highest honors, Oberlin College

Summary

Eve Bratman is an assistant professor at SIS. Dr. Bratman’s research involves sustainable development politics in the Brazilian Amazon. Her major research projects focus on the links between environmental policy, agriculture, and human rights in Brazil and beyond. Her book-in-progress tentatively entitled “Development’s Crossroads: Infrastructure, Sustainability, and Human Rights in the Brazilian Amazon” and is based on nearly a decade of research and work in Brazil. Dr. Bratman also has a keen interest in urban politics and development issues closer to home, including in Washington DC.

Dr. Bratman holds a Ph.D. from American University’s School of International Service (2009). She was a Fulbright Scholar in Brazil (2007) and holds a Certificate in Human Rights from the Washington College of Law (2004).

Languages Spoken: Portuguese (fluent), Spanish and French (proficiency)

Q&A with Eve Bratman

Honors, Awards, and Fellowships

  • Dean’s Summer Research Award, American University School of International Service, 2012
  • Beekeeping: Honeydrop Beverages, “Buy a Bottle, Save a Bee” partner beekeeper 2012-present, and Green Eagle Sustainability Fund Grantee, American University, 2011
  • Dissertation Fellowship, American University, 2008
  • Fulbright Scholar, Brazil, 2006 – 2007
  • Hurst Fellowship for Doctoral Studies, American University, 2003 – 2006
  • Oberlin College Alumni Grant recipient, 2006
  • Scholarship recipient, Rail-Volution Conference, 2002
  • Concert Starr Award in Politics, Oberlin College, 2001
  • Grant for urban ecological design research in Curitiba, Brazil, Oberlin College, 2001
  • National Merit Scholar, 1997 – 2001
  • Una Chapman Cox Scholarship, for US State Department Internship, US Mission to the UN, Geneva, Switzerland, 1999

Professional Presentations

  • “Civic Education, Global Community, and Service Learning at American University” Panelist, International Association for Research on Service-learning and Community Engagement (IARSLCE) Conference, Baltimore, MD, September 2012.
  • “Development’s Murky Waters:  Symbolic Struggle and Brazil’s Belo Monte Dam” Paper presentation, Development Sociology Conference, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, November 2012.
  • “Dynamics of Repetition? Transnational Advocacy Networks and Twenty Years of Belo Monte Dam Activism” Paper presentation, Annual Meeting of the International Studies Association (ISA), San Diego, CA, April 2012.
  • “Overdevelopment: Limits and the Problem of Development” Paper presentation, Annual Meeting of the Association of American Geographers (AAG), New York, NY, February 2012.
  • “Protecting Trees and People Equally? Human Rights and Environment in the Eastern Brazilian Amazon.” Paper presentation, Conference on the 500th Anniversary of the Universality of Human Rights, George Mason University / Alma College, December 2011.
  • “Towards Reflexive Development: Understanding Washington, DC as a Third World City.” Paper presentation, Rethinking Development Conference, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, November 2011.
  • “Brazilian Responses to Food Security, Lessons from Belo Horizonte.” Co-presenter, Community Food Security Coalition Annual Conference, New Orleans, LA, November 2010.
  • “Framing Advocacy Efforts and Environmental Rights: A Case Study from the Brazilian Amazon.” Invited presentation to the American University Human Rights Summer Institute, Washington DC, May 2010.
  • “Tragic Hero, Dubious Villain: The Political Ecology of Beef in the Brazilian Amazon in Relation to Sustainable Development Efforts.” Paper presentation, Annual Meeting of the Association of American Geographers (AAG), Washington, DC, April 2010.
  • “Adaptations and Innovations in the Face of Amazon Conservation and Development Challenges: Applying Field Research to Understand Community and Household Strategies across the Basin.” Paper presentation, Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association (AAA), Philadelphia, PA, December 2009.

Selected Publications

  • “Development’s Paradox: Washington DC is a Third World City?” Third World Quarterly, 32: 9 (November, 2011).
  • “Villains, Victims, and Conservationists? Representational Frameworks and Sustainable Development on the Transamazon Highway.” Human Ecology, 39:4 (August 2011), pp. 441-453.
  • “The Green Movement” in Kim Kennedy White, ed. America Goes Green: An Encyclopedia of Eco-Friendly Culture in the United States. ABC-Clio, (Forthcoming, 2012).
  • “Washington, DC” in Kim Kennedy White, ed. America Goes Green: An Encyclopedia of Eco-Friendly Culture in the United States. ABC-Clio, (Forthcoming, 2012).
  • “Projeto de Desenvolvimento Sustentável Realiza Curso de Beneficiamento de Sementes para Artesanato.” Guia Amata, 3: 34, August 2007.

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