Progress or Prolonged Conflict? Elections in Mali

The French-led intervention in Mali started out with a bang. In a matter of weeks, the Al-Qaeda-linked Islamic groups Ansar Dine and the Movement for Oneness and Jihad in Northern Africa (MUJWA), that had taken over the ethnic Tuareg rebellion, were driven from Timbuktu, Gao, and other major towns...

Arctic Council Adds Five Permanent Asian Observers

During a meeting on May 15 in Kiruna, Sweden, the eight-member Arctic Council agreed that China, India, Italy, Japan, South Korea, and Singapore would become permanent observers of the council...

Q&A with Politics of Global Development Professor

Eve Bratman is an assistant professor at SIS. Dr. Bratman’s research involves sustainable development politics in the Brazilian Amazon. Her major research projects focus on the links between environmental policy, agriculture, and human rights in Brazil and beyond...

Amid Growing Regional Tension, Japan Shifts Away From Pacifism

 

In response to escalating nuclear threats from North Korea and China’s increasingly bold claims to a disputed island chain in the East China Sea, Japanese leaders are quietly embarking on a military transition away from the country’s postwar pacifism...

20 Women Changing the World

Angela Merkel has been called “the decider” and “the de facto leader of the European Union” for her prominent role in managing the European debt crisis. Her hardline prescriptions of austerity to stabilize debt-ridden European economies have earned her both praise and organized protests from different...

Q&A with Security from Inside the State Professor

Sharon K. Weiner writes about the intersection of organizational politics and U.S. national security policy. Her book Our Own Worst Enemy? Institutional Interests and the Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons Expertise (MIT Press 2011) examines the role of organizational and partisan politics in the success and failure of...